Book Review: My Sister, the Serial Killer

I was looking forward to reading this after constantly eyeing it up on the shelves back when the bookshops were still open. The physical cover itself is striking but so is the title itself. What could be more ominous than knowing your sister is a serial killer?

Synopsis from Goodreads

My Sister, the Serial Killer is a blackly comic novel about how blood is thicker – and more difficult to get out of the carpet – than water…

When Korede’s dinner is interrupted one night by a distress call from her sister, Ayoola, she knows what’s expected of her: bleach, rubber gloves, nerves of steel and a strong stomach. This’ll be the third boyfriend Ayoola’s dispatched in, quote, self-defence and the third mess that her lethal little sibling has left Korede to clear away. She should probably go to the police for the good of the menfolk of Nigeria, but she loves her sister and, as they say, family always comes first. Until, that is, Ayoola starts dating the doctor where Korede works as a nurse. Korede’s long been in love with him, and isn’t prepared to see him wind up with a knife in his back: but to save one would mean sacrificing the other…

Image: Amazon

Review ~ ★★★.5/★★★★★ 

Genres: Novel, satire, thriller, crime-fiction

This book caught my attention right from the offset. Even before starting to read it the premise seemed odd and strangely appealing.

The protagonist, Korede is fully aware of her sister, Ayoola’s tendencies to murder boyfriends. One night she’s called up and has to help dispose the body of her latest victim. The way she accepts it as part of daily life, is both comical and alluring. It makes you want to read the book to find out how Korede comes to terms with this herself and how it has become so normalised between them. No one else in the family knows about these events. Throughout the novel Korede becomes more worried about her sister and the potential next victim. The horrific events of Ayoola’s actions are told in such a matter of fact, down to earth way that I have never encountered before. I guess it’s meant to be a kind of dark humor, it definitely gets points for originality – I’ve never read a book like it and was taken aback (in a good way) by its approach.

The crime genre scene is usually dominated by British and American parameters, so it was refreshing to see an entirely different setting. The novel is set in Lagos, the capital of Nigeria, and is deeply embedded within its culture. Both sisters have also had a troubled upbringing, due to abuse from their father, however, this isn’t really explored until the final pages. I liked the main two characters but felt the novel doesn’t give you the chance to get to know them.

The chapters themselves are short and snappy and this gives a level of pace to the book which I really liked. Although it is a short book anyway, I ended up flying through the chapters. I liked the way it seemed to mirror the nature of Ayoola’s personality and the flip decisions she seemed to make.

The initial grab for this book is definitely there – it has an intriguing and original feel, which offers the potential for a truly gripping story, however, I found my attention dwindling about three quarters of the way through. I no longer felt the compulsion to read on, in the way I had done in the beginning.

Being a short novel it is naturally restricted by the amount of depth it can convey, but in this case, I think extending the novel would have turned it into something excellent. This book lost me in the lack of character development and background information. There are fleeting references to how life was with their father around, despite it having an evident influence on their lives. We are only really given an insight into this at the end, having it at the beginning in more depth, could have added far more weight to the characters and the story as a whole.

I felt as if things just happened tentatively, without any real depth or connection to a bigger picture. The novel starts with a bang and hooks the reader straight away, however, it allowed itself to trail off into nothingness. Nothing major happens, there are no turning points or dramatic events, it just kind of finishes. Therefore, I found it lost its initial suspense and appeal quite suddenly, which resulted in a disappointing reading experience.

Overall, I liked the premise of this book and its originality, and certainly enjoyed its feel, which was what kept me reading. I liked the protagonist, Korede and her sister, Ayoola, but just wish I could have known more about them. The novel lacked depth and lost momentum, allowing little room for the darkly comical and complex story it could have been. It’s definitely worth a read, but don’t expect it to blow you away.

Cover image: Kristian Hammerstad for New Statesman

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: My Sister, the Serial Killer

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