Book Review: The Bridge of Little Jeremy

The Bridge of Little Jeremy is a multifaceted, charming, literary fiction must read. I was drawn in by the setting of beautiful Paris, and the love of art the novel immediately conveys through its lyrical descriptions of life in the city. It is a story told through the unique insight of a twelve year old boy and his relationship with his best friend, Leon – a German shepherd. Intertwined with everyday musings about the city of Paris, is a story about a boy who tries to save his mother from financial ruin. It’s endearing, poignant, beautiful and will break your heart.

Please note – I was sent a copy of this book, but have not been paid to say any of the following. Everything is my own opinion.

Synopsis from Goodreads

“Jeremy’s mother is about to go to prison for their debt to the State. He is trying everything within his means to save her, but his options are running out fast.

Then Jeremy discovers a treasure under Paris.

This discovery may save his mother, but it doesn’t come for free. And he has to ride over several obstacles for his plan to work.

Meanwhile, something else is limiting his time…”

Review

Title: The Bridge of Little Jeremy

Author: Indrajit Garai

Genres: Fiction, literary fiction

My rating: ★★★★

What I loved the most about this book was that it took me by surprise.  I was so invested in the story and the main character Jeremy, navigating his days through Paris with his best friend, Leon. The story is completely told through the perspective of Jeremy, who lives with a severe heart condition. As readers, we learn more about his condition as the story goes on.

The book is told through first person narration, so the reader sees everything through the eyes and ears of Jeremy. I haven’t read many books which are narrated by such young protagonists, before reading this book I was hesitant, as in the past I haven’t enjoyed these perspectives, however this really surprised me. Jeremy is wise beyond his years, has an eye for the most beautiful things in life and thinks about things deeply. Naturally, I got along with his persona. His personality inevitably leaves the reader fully wishing for him to get a happy ending – as he is kind, resilient, talented, hardworking and has an eye for seeing and capturing the beauty around him. 

Jeremy wants to do all that he can to help his Mum out of financial ruin so they do not get their flat taken away from them. When he discovers an ancient painting in the cellar of their flat, he takes it upon himself to find out the history of the painting and restore it himself, so that he can make money for his Mum. During this journey, Jeremy provides us with beautiful descriptions of Paris during his daily walks with Leon. He truly sees the world in brushstrokes, colour, depth and shape, which mirrors his talent for painting. I frequently forgot Jeremy was only twelve – it was such a unique perspective for me to read and I really enjoyed viewing life through his eyes. The reader, like Jeremy himself, often forgets that his life is a very fragile one, Jeremy fears having the next heart operation, but tries to live every day the best he can.

Additionally, I enjoyed the prose in this book. Jeremy’s observations about life and scenes in Paris are told through dreamy, lyrical and descriptive language that has the ability to take you away from the present. It is a story about art and the power of beauty, that is utterly mirrored by its own use of language. As a result of this, I found myself finding the reading process incredibly relaxing and soothing to read. I’ve never really experienced this from reading a book before, but there was something about Jeremy’s daily walks with Leon, exploring the same scenes and documenting it so visually, that calmed me in a time where I’ve been feeling so much unease.

The story itself is a work of art as it has so many layers. It may be a story fundamentally, about saving a piece of art to save a family, but it contains so many other facets. There is an element of suspense throughout, as the reader cannot predict whether Jeremy will be successful in restoring the painting and whether his health will improve. The financial situation for his Mother seems to worsen day by day, despite her working so much overtime. But will the two of them get to keep the family home they so know and love? Can a painting save their future? 

There are other themes explored such as the importance of family, friends and a prevailing sense of achieving social justice which runs through the book. Jeremy is motivated to help his Mum on a personal level but also because he thinks it’s wrong that she could have her home taken away from her, even through it was inherited through the family. For a twelve year old, Jeremy certainly has an awareness of social justice in the adult world. Above all, it is a story that values a love and appreciation of art, how it can transcend decades and take us to other places. It stresses the importance of imagination and our ability to see the beauty in the everyday, before it’s too late. The novel is complex, engaging and full of suspense – I loved reading it to see how it would unfold. 

However, the ending was not what I had hoped for. I found it slightly abrupt and unfulfilling. Considering the rest of the story is so complex and well told, I found the ending to lack the closure it deserved. It is the only part of the story I felt was underdeveloped but maybe I am just being selfish in my criticisms as it wasn’t the ending I would have written. . Nevertheless, these are merely my personal, petty criticisms. We can’t always get the ending we want… Perhaps that’s the point here?

All in all, this is a beautiful story and reading experience that I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend to anyone. I thoroughly appreciated the perspective of a twelve year old boy telling the story and the experience of becoming his eyes and ears, as he navigates Paris and attempts to bring an ancient painting back to life.

There are so many elements of sadness in the story, but these are always combined with plentiful beauty, as to remind us that there is always light, even when we may be surrounded by darkness.

“Yet life never comes in pure black and white. On the contrary, life always comes in patches of ambiguities, as on an impressionist painting; but, among its lights and shadows, you can add details from your imagination then interpret the result the way you like.”

The Bridge of Little Jeremy is available via Amazon.

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